« Run Dick Run! | Main | Conservative Defends War Profiteering »

A Republican Exit Strategy for Iraq

Charlie Cook has some interesting speculation about a Republican exit strategy from Iraq

Republican congressional leaders are already sending not-so-subtle signals to the White House that their patience is wearing thin and that their willingness to serve as spear-catchers for the president on the war is waning. The fact that Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz are still in their jobs, however, demonstrates that even not-so-subtle messages are often ignored by this White House.

Many observers believe that unless the troop surge unexpectedly succeeds by late summer or early fall, Republican lawmakers will begin saying forthrightly they can no longer support Bush on the war. At that point, some suspect, the president will be forced to withdraw two-thirds of the U.S. troops from Iraq and assign the rest to securing the country's borders. The remaining troops would spend a little time patrolling populated areas and protecting oil facilities but would significantly reduce their own vulnerability.

To be sure, foreign-policy experts are generally appalled by such a possibility, pronouncing it a losing proposition and unsustainable. But, so is the status quo. The difference is that the pullback scenario is a losing proposition with many troops headed home and with much lower U.S. casualty rate than the current losing proposition.

Regardless of what happens in Iraq, Bush will leave office in January 2009. The question that Republicans on Capitol Hill are asking themselves is how many of them will be forced to leave at the same time.

Don't expect to hear Republican lawmakers say, "We were wrong; Democrats were right." That's not going to happen. Instead, watch for GOP strategists to begin building a story line that the United States spent precious lives and treasure to give Iraqis a chance but that the Iraqi government never did its part -- never assumed responsibility for taking control of its own country, never made the tough decisions that building a nation requires.

Sounds right to me. Blame the Iraqis, never admit that the Democrats were right about the war, and move on.

That's fine by me. Whatever gets us out.


Note: Wizbang Blue is now closed and our authors have moved on. Paul Hooson can now be found at Wizbang Pop!. Please come see him there!

  • Currently 3/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 3/5 (4 votes cast)


Comments (4)

Paul Hamilton:

I don't really understand why it would be our job to secure the borders if the whole nation was in chaos.

Hell, there'd be more people trying to get OUT than to get in...

...Republican lawmakers will begin saying forthrightly they can no longer support Bush on the war. At that point, some suspect, the president will be forced to withdraw two-thirds of the U.S. troops from Iraq and assign the rest to securing the country's borders.

Those who suspect that Bush will be forced to withdraw troops at that point have more faith in Bush's sensibilities than I do. He'll dance and prance and not do a damn thing, leaving the mess to his predecessor instead, is my guess.

Heralder:

Part of the problem with this sentiment:

"We were wrong; Democrats were right."

...is that the Democrats have been working to make themselves right, rather than working for an actual comprehensive strategy or solution.

Cutting funding for the troops certainly makes them look like they were right about completely reversing their stance on the war, because it will cause us to lose it. They're attempting to fulfill their own prophecy just so they can say "I told you so."


Regarding:

Instead, watch for GOP strategists to begin building a story line that the United States spent precious lives and treasure to give Iraqis a chance but that the Iraqi government never did its part -- never assumed responsibility for taking control of its own country, never made the tough decisions that building a nation requires.

Interesting, it's the actual setup for the "I told you so" moment...heralding what they see to be the factual case, so when the Republicans point it out they can call it an excuse.

As of late the only tough decisions the Iraqi government has made is how much to beg that we don't leave, and whether to take 2 or 3 months of vacation.

ryan a:

Personally, I am not excited about further politicization of this war. It would be better if both sides would stop all the nonsense, sit down, and start working together to get some issues solved.

I have been against the war from the start, especially the massive ground invasion/occupation. I was under the impression that we were not going to run around working on nation building projects.

Hussein was certainly a brutal dictator, and someone who needed to be dealt with. But, I think that we had some other options besides a full scale invasion. And Hussein was taken care of years ago, yet we are still in Iraq attempting to implant long distance democracy via tanks, humvees, and troops.

The question is how do we want to deal with Hussein types, what is the best method? It's important, in my view, that we don't get caught supporting folks like Hussein/Pinochet/Somoza etc. ever again, since those types of repressive regimes breed violence and radical reactions.

I am pretty sure that MOST countries on this planet would resist pretty much ANY foreign occupying force. So we might need to rethink our strategy and our presence over there in Iraq, considering the fact that many Iraqis themselves are clearly fighting against us.

We are in Iraq now, and we all have to stop freaking out on one another so what *maybe* we can figure out a solution that won't be a massive disaster (one that doesn't make things worse). I think that this is possible, but only because my optimism meter is running a little high today since I just finished finals.

Conservatives might cosider realizing that Liberals aren't all tree hugging-hippy idiots, and Liberals might want to consider the possibility that Conservatives are not all the spawn of satan/hitler.

Turning every issue into an opportunity to score political points is going to get us all nowhere. We all might have our disagreements, but we're still going to have to get past those and figure some things out in some kind of bipartisan way.

/tuesday morning soapbox session


Advertisments

Categories

Archives

Technorati



Add to Technorati Favorites

Credits

Publisher: Kevin Aylward

Editors: Lee Ward, Larkin, Paul S Hooson, and Steve Crickmore

All original content copyright © 2007 by Wizbang®, LLC. All rights reserved. Wizbang® is a registered service mark. Wizbang Blue™ is a trademark of Wizbang®, LLC.

Powered by Movable Type 3.35

Hosting by ServInt

Ratings on this site are powered by the Ajax Ratings Pro plugin for Movable Type.

Search on this site is powered by the FastSearch plugin for Movable Type.

Blogrolls on this site are powered by the MT-Blogroll.

Temporary site design is based on Cutline and Cutline for MT. Graphics by Apothegm Designs.